Andrew Lamberto – Succession Planning

Andrew Lamberto created a plan to help the county of San Bernardino keep the professionals who were currently working and find new employees who could be just as productive. He created a presentation for his plan which focused on a few key aspects of the plan.

Andrew Lamberto

Why Is Succession Planning Necessary?

It is expected that the retirement of the baby boomers will produce a sharp decline in available personnel at the higher levels in the organization. Executives, now and in the future, are expected to be more sophisticated. Agencies need to find a way to keep their talented people. Succession Planning helps find, assess, develop, and monitor the most valuable employees.

Benefits Of A Plan

Succession planning helps retain superior employees, to not lose a strong effective leader. It also allows companies to identify gaps in talent and understand their development needs. It can help employers identify jobs that are critical to the overall success of the organization.

Steps Of The Plan

There are a few steps to put the plan into effect. First, the company or agency must identify future needs. It must then complete talent assessments to identify the talent pool. The next step is to develop a set of core competencies to establish a standard of comparison for assessment. The agency can then assist employees to develop their knowledge, skills, and abilities to prepare them for advancement to more challenging roles. It must also provide meaningful appraisals and feedback.

Andrew Lamberto was able to come up with the idea for Succession Planning and also find a way to put the plan into action. The plan can help agencies become more aware of the talents and skills of their current employees and their need for new ones.

Also can read: Andrew Lamberto – Service FIRST 

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Author: Andrew Lamberto

Andrew Lamberto was the Director of Human Resources for the County of San Bernardino, California for over ten years. He served in a dual capacity as the Executive Administrator over two departments in the County, Risk Management and Information Services. He was oneof the principal assistants to the Chief Executive Officer of the County, which employs over 21,000 people in the area.